Olvera Street

125 Paseo De La Plaza, LA, CA 90012
213-485-3730

El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument at Olvera Street is near the site of the early Los Angeles pueblo or town where forty-four settlers of Native American, African and European heritage journeyed more than one-thousand miles across the desert from present-day northern Mexico and established a farming community in September 1781. Since that time, Los Angeles has been under the flags of Spain, Mexico and the United States and has grown into one of the world’s largest metropolitan areas. Today, as a department of the City of Los Angeles, El Pueblo is a living museum that continues to fulfill its unique role as the historic and symbolic heart of the city, reflecting the Native American, African American, Spanish, Anglo, Mexican, Chinese, Italian and French cultures that contributed to its early history. Of the monument’s twenty-seven historic buildings, eleven are open to the public as businesses or have been restored as museums. El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument has served as a symbol of L.A.’s rich history, culture and diversity. As the oldest section of the city, it is the site where Los Angeles was founded.

Today, El Pueblo consists of twenty seven historic buildings on 44 acres, a beautiful outdoor plaza area and the world famous Olvera Street Mexican marketplace. Each building tells an exciting story about the people of the different ethnic groups who settled here.

Avila Adobe
Chinese American Museum
Plaza Firehouse Museum
Sepulveda House
Italian American Museum

A collection of historic buildings, artifacts, museums and exhibits (both indoor and outdoor). The most famous parts of the Monument are Olvera Street and the Chinese American Museum. As you wander through the Monument grounds, you’ll find exhibits and museums, such as the Old Plaza Firehouse Museum (open Tues-Fri, 10AM-3PM), Avila Adobe (open Wed-Sun, 10AM-3PM) and the Sepulveda House (open daily, 9AM-4PM). There are ongoing exhibits at the Pico House, El Pueblo Gallery, and Hellman/Quon building. Most of the exhibits are free! [near Union Station]

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